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CF Haviland & GDM Antique Porcelain Green Gold Enamel Scalloped Salad Plates Set of 6 SOLD

CF Haviland & GDM Antique Porcelain Green Gold Enamel Scalloped Salad Plates Set of 6 SOLD
Item# CFHavilandGDM
Availability: Usually ships in 2-3 business days

Product Description And Additional Pictures

We are pleased to offer an elegant set of 6 antique salad plates produced between 1881 and 1890 by Gerard, Dufraisseix and Morel, the successors to the renowned firm of Charles Field Haviland & Cie. These plates are elegant in a deceptively simple (or is all elegance deceptively simple?) way. Glazed in pure white with a gold edge at the rim, these 8-1/2" plates are set off by amazing, thick strokes of green and gold enamel at the rim and the verge. The overall effect is of an almost hasty dollop of trim that decorates the plates in a most enchanting way. These plates are perfect. Despite the fact that they are over one hundred years old, there are very few utensil marks, and no chips, cracks or other condition issues. There are a few spots on the rims that feel a tad sharp, but this is from the excess enamel drying during the firing process. These plates carry two underglaze backstamps. The first is the traditional, red Charles Field Haviland, Limoges mark between two circles that was used between 1882 to 1900, and the second mark is the green CFH over GDM that was used from 1890 to 1900. It is safe to conclude that these plates were produced sometime between 1890 and 1900.

BRIEF HISTORY: In 1881, after a long and successful career, Charles Field Haviland reitred, and the firm of Charles Field Haviland & Cie was taken over by E. Gerard, J.B. Dufraisseix, and Morel, forming the acronym GDM. The three new owners continued to use the red circular CFH backstamp, but also employed a combined CFH/GDM mark to signify the new ownership of the firm. Gerard acted as the director of the firm, Dufraisseix was the decorator, and Morel was the color technician. Under Morel, who specialized in high temperature colors, the firm added bright clear colors to the palette. Morel left the firm in 1890.