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Huge Lenox Ivory Reticulated Footed Centerpiece Bowl With Gilded Scallops

Huge Lenox Ivory Reticulated Footed Centerpiece Bowl With Gilded Scallops
Item# LenoxReticulatedBowl
$195.00
Availability: Usually ships in 2-3 business days

Product Description And Additional Pictures

The Antiquarians were very pleased when they found this HUGE reticulated and footed Lenox centerpiece bowl. Not only is this bowl beautiful, but it is large enough to be functional when the dining table is filled with guests, measuring a full 10" in diameter at the scalloped and gilded rim, 5" in height from the base, and 6" in diameter across the footed and gilded base. This ivory confection is truly beautiful, with a reticulated floral design incised around the rim of the bowl and positioned under each gilded scallop. A design of raised ribbing rises from the base and alternates with formal columns of leafed-out branches topped by triadic arches. This bowl is intensely and intricately designed! It is in perfect condition, with no cracks, nicks or chips. Bearing a backstamp from the 1990's, this bowl is well-positioned to age gracefully in your home, becoming tomorrow's rare treasure!

BRIEF HISTORY: Walter Scott Lenox founded the Ceramic Art Company (CAC), the predecessor of Lenox China, in Trenton, New Jersey in 1889. He co-owned CAC with Jonothon Coxon, Sr. Prior to founding CAC, Lenox trained as an apprentice potter at ceramic studios in the Trenton area, eventually becoming design director, first at Ott and Brewer, and then at Willets Manufacturing. Company records report that the initial Lenox manufactory was organized more as an art studio than a factory. Rather than offering a complete line of ceramics, Lenox offered one-of-a-kind pieces produced from lustrous ivory. Working initially with only 18 employees, Lenox china quickly became known among the most exclusive shops in England. By 1897, some pieces of Lenox porcelain were being displayed in the Smithsonian Institute. Lenox' intention was to compete with quality European china, and it quickly became apparent that the product bearing his name did indeed rival that of imported European porcelain. Lenox dinnerware is world renowned for its consistency in coloring, meticulous and detailed designs, durable construction, and the smoothness of the glazing.